Annual Report and Accounts 2013

Our People and Safety

DP World Institute training programme (UAE)

We consider our dynamic and professional team of over 30,000 people to be our biggest competitive advantage; we value them as individuals and as a global team.

Our global Human Capital strategy is to:

  • build a high performance workforce;
  • encourage a learning and innovative organisation;
  • add value to our market reputation;
  • be an employer of choice; and
  • contribute to diversity management.

Our recruitment policy and processes are designed to recruit candidates that share our values of teamwork, commitment, responsibility, collaboration and innovation and we prioritise internal promotion wherever possible. Standardising our selection and recruitment process gives us comfort that our long-term staffing needs will match our business demands.

By fostering a culture of excellence in performance through role and goal clarity we provide our people with the opportunity to learn and grow giving them the skills they need to succeed and creating a solid platform of resilient and efficient employees.

Our performance in 2013

During 2013, a wide range of initiatives were rolled out in line with our Human Capital strategy:

  • The newly-developed Planning Terminal Operations workshops were rolled out across the business, allowing our people with operational, planning and execution duties to practice and develop their skills in a realistic and safe environment. We deployed state-of-the-art simulation software and real versions of our terminal operating systems for our people to investigate a range of optimisation tools and techniques. Visual feedback tools and KPIs demonstrate the operational and financial impact of different operational strategies and plans, and allow our people to test and understand different techniques safely, then develop improvement plans for implementation in live operations.
  • A new framework for leadership development was implemented using a range of globally-recognised academic experts, teams of regionally based leadership facilitators and internal resources. A new leadership learning curriculum was developed, built around four strategic leadership pillars aligned with DP World’s organisational strategies and priorities; translating strategy, innovation & collaboration, leading change and corporate responsibility.
  • Further progress was made with using new technology to deliver more flexible and far-reaching learning solutions to our people. One example is the iLearn web-based learning management system, which offers eLearning courses, tutor-led webinar sessions and work-based assignments. This allows for more flexible learning that is linked more realistically to workplace examples and situations.
  • As well as continuing to deliver the well-established Advanced Trainer and Assessor (ATAP) programme, support was extended to the regions and business units to enhance their local training activities. This has seen DP World Institute staff provide advisory support to terminals and port authorities on the setting-up of operational training. Support in developing local training capability was also delivered. This will result in best-practice processes and learning material being offered to the wider port community.

Business improvement projects were also undertaken by our people attending DP World Institute programmes. During 2013, projects were launched with the aim of:

  • improving radio communication systems and technology;
  • introducing new processes for handling out-of-gauge cargo at breakwater berths;
  • improving fuel consumption by improving yard layout;
  • revising guidelines for operational supervisors;
  • reducing risk of injury by using a seal inspection platform and quay edge protection;
  • using remote cameras to improve operational supervision; and
  • introducing focused toolbox talks to improve equipment operator performance.

Engaging our people

We recognise the need to have a solid understanding of the attitudes and opinions of our people, and to use this insight to foster the creation of a highly engaged workforce and retain our existing talent pool. Furthermore, we benefit from understanding the relationship between employee engagement and business performance. We measure these key indicators biannually through our My World employee engagement survey which we then use to benchmark ourselves globally.

The My World survey was conducted in 2013 in 26 languages and we received over 16,000 responses which represents a response rate of 77%20. Nineteen categories were surveyed ranging from leadership, development and growth, corporate responsibility and diversity.

Against the global high performance companies norm, the 2013 results indicate that we are performing strongly and we are pleased to see that our people see their development and growth and customer focus as two areas where we are particularly strong.

The survey results indicate that safety, working conditions and workload, customer focus and corporate responsibility are key to driving sustainable engagement across our business. As well as analysing the views of our people, we appreciate that their views impact on other business metrics, such as safety (lost time injury frequency rates), operations (truck turnaround time), financial (EBITDA) and human capital (absenteeism). Understanding these links allows us to focus on the areas of priority with the aim of improving our business performance.

20 The 77% response rate is calculated based on the participating business units within our Group that took part in the 2013 survey.

EMPLOYEE METRICS

The diversity of our workforce is reflected in our business focus on growing markets.

Reflecting the operational nature of our business, a large majority of our workforce is employed in an operational capacity. This is managed by an appropriate proportion of middle management who provide support to executive management in achieving the strategic priorities of our Company.

We continue to have a well-diversified age profile across our Group. A strong emphasis on succession planning which is overseen by the Board, reflects the importance of ensuring we have a sustainable work force with the right people available who have the right skills to meet our need today and in the future. A framework of performance management, individual development and succession planning supports our business.

The development of new business and business expansion continues to be reflected in the increase in DP World’s workforce. With 48% of our people being considered new joiners, we ensure that our outlook remains fresh, while retaining 52% of our staff for more than five years ensures we maintain a stable, well-diversified workforce providing operational and functional expertise to support new joiners.

This graph shows the gender diversity of our people as at 31 December 2013. Our commitment to diversity was evidenced in 2013 with the Board approving a board diversity policy. Further information on our board diversity policy is available in the Report of the Directors. While we are proud of the diversity of our people, this is one area that we will work to improve in 2014 and beyond.

The gender diversity amongst our senior managers is shown in the graph below. We define a senior manager as a person who contributes to the planning or direction of our business, or a strategically significant part of our business.

The diversity of our workforce is reflected in our business focus on growing markets.

Reflecting the operational nature of our business, a large majority of our workforce is employed in an operational capacity. This is managed by an appropriate proportion of middle management who provide support to executive management in achieving the strategic priorities of our Company.

We continue to have a well-diversified age profile across our Group. A strong emphasis on succession planning which is overseen by the Board, reflects the importance of ensuring we have a sustainable work force with the right people available who have the right skills to meet our need today and in the future. A framework of performance management, individual development and succession planning supports our business.

The development of new business and business expansion continues to be reflected in the increase in DP World’s workforce. With 48% of our people being considered new joiners, we ensure that our outlook remains fresh, while retaining 52% of our staff for more than five years ensures we maintain a stable, well-diversified workforce providing operational and functional expertise to support new joiners.

This graph shows the gender diversity of our people as at 31 December 2013. Our commitment to diversity was evidenced in 2013 with the Board approving a board diversity policy. Further information on our board diversity policy is available in the Report of the Directors. While we are proud of the diversity of our people, this is one area that we will work to improve in 2014 and beyond.

The gender diversity amongst our senior managers is shown in the graph below. We define a senior manager as a person who contributes to the planning or direction of our business, or a strategically significant part of our business.

Safety cage demonstration at DP World Jebel Ali (UAE)

Our people are the key to our success; their safety, security and wellbeing is our top priority. Our goal is zero harm, with safety as a business wide objective at the heart of our operations. Our policies meet or exceed national health and safety legislation in the markets in which we operate.

“SAFETY AT ALL OUR PORTS AND MARINE TERMINALS IS A TOP PRIORITY, NOT JUST FOR OUR OWN PEOPLE BUT ALSO FOR ALL THOSE WHO MUST COME ONTO OUR FACILITIES AS PART OF THEIR JOB.”

SULTAN AHMED BIN SULAYEM CHAIRMAN
DP World Nhava Sheva (India)
DP World Caucedo (Dominican Republic)

Our commitment to safety

Regardless of where our people are located, or the type of work we undertake, we strive to create an injury free, safe working environment.

We have a fully dedicated Global Safety and Environment Department supported by regional safety teams. Global policies and guidelines are implemented to achieve the safest and most efficient methods of operation. We comply with all aspects of the internationally recognised certification system OHSAS 18001.

We have zero tolerance of conditions and behaviours contributing to workplace incidents. Compliance with our policies and guidelines is regularly audited to help us improve our processes and move towards achieving our goal of zero harm.

We have released a set of new global engagement programmes that our terminals must implement to ensure we manage our highest risk activities across our organisation. These stringent programmes are aimed at protecting all personnel onsite, our assets and the environment. The released engagement programmes identify, assess and control seven key high-risk operational areas: working at heights, vessel safety, terminal equipment, isolation, yard and quay operations and terminal access gates.

As part of enhancing our capability to reduce risk in the yard, we facilitated a programme for external truck drivers. The programme is aimed at ensuring that we have clear guidance for engaging and managing our external truck drivers who enter our terminals. During 2013, Jebel Ali (UAE) inducted approximately 5000 external truck drivers into this programme.

OUR PERFORMANCE IN 2013

We report on all safety and environmental impacts over which we have operational control or if one of our subsidiaries has the authority to introduce and implement our operating policies at the business unit.

Accident and incident data is collected, analysed, reported and monitored monthly and used to measure the safety performance across the Group. All accidents are thoroughly investigated and a working group has been established to highlight trends associated with recurring incidents, reduce risk factors and identify and implement control measures aimed at eliminating future incidents.

Despite handling increased global volumes during 2013, we achieved a significant reduction in lost time injuries (LTIs); equivalent to a 16% reduction in our recorded lost time injuries and a 12% reduction in our lost time injuries frequency rate (LTIFR) when compared with our 2012 figures.

Furthermore, the overall reportable injuries have consistently reduced over the past five years and in 2013, we achieved a 19% reduction in our reportable injury frequency rate (RIFR) compared with our 2012 figures. We have also reduced the number of injuries requiring visits to doctors or hospitals across the same period.

Despite our improved safety record and our ongoing commitment to achieving a zero harm working environment, one person tragically lost their life in one of our facilities in 2013. A loss of life is unacceptable and a thorough investigation of the incident identified root causes which have been communicated across our organisation to ensure that we learn from this and implement control measures to help us achieve and sustain our goal of zero harm.

SECURITY

We are committed to the wellbeing, safety and security of our people along with our other assets and cargo, and our security strategy is based on investing in security management systems that comply with global standards. We underpin our strategic security objectives by embracing and investing in the independently audited supply chain security management ISO 28000 standard across our portfolio. We made further progress in rolling out the ISO 28000 standard in 2013 and, to date, we have 35 terminals certified.

We regularly undertake benchmarking exercises to test our security preparedness against global standards and industry best practice. Constantly investing in our business continuity capabilities is at the core of our security mandate and is a commitment to our people and also to the communities we serve.

Case study

The Eugen Maersk receiving assistance at DP World’s Doraleh Container Terminal (Djibouti)

Doraleh Vessel Fire

The Eugen Maersk, a 397 metre, Maersk E-Class vessel en route from Malaysia to the Netherlands, reported a fire on board and requested urgent assistance. The nearest port of call was DP World’s Doraleh Container Terminal in Djibouti.

An emergency response plan was immediately implemented which involved a global team with a wealth of experience and expertise. The terminal’s operations, engineering, safety, planning and security representatives liaised with Maersk Line, the Harbour Master, Fire Brigade Manager and Djibouti Ports & Free Zones Authority.

Maersk Line sent a number of its own experts and salvage specialists from Svitzer to assist with the co-ordination and execution of the plan.

The team worked to stabilise the stacks and fabricated steel bracing structures that were welded in place between rows to prevent container movement once the lifting began. Over the next 12 days, the team carefully responded by removing one container at a time, reassessing the situation after each move.

The key element throughout the whole operation was communication and the number one priority, as always, was safety. Precautions and overall risk management were paramount. In a note to all stakeholders as the Eugen Maersk set sail safely, Doraleh Container Terminal CEO Nawaf Nassir Abdullah said: “during these critical operational activities we achieved zero injury and zero container damage. Credit goes to the entire team that made this possible.”


A lost time injury is an injury directly related to a workplace incident resulting in injury or illness where, through medical direction or personnel circumstances, the person is unable to return and complete their next scheduled work shift.


The lost time injury frequency rate is the total number of lost time injuries divided by the total hours worked and then multiplied by one million:

A reportable injury includes fatalities, lost time injuries and medical treatment injuries.

Lost time injuries are defined above and a medical treatment injury is one directly related to a workplace incident resulting in injury or illness where the person can only receive prescribed medical attention either onsite and/or offsite by an authorised medical practitioner. Following treatment, this person can either return to normal or restricted duties without the loss of a full shift.

The reportable injury frequency rate is the sum total of fatalities, lost time and medical treatment injuries divided by the total hours worked and then multiplied by one million: